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Top 5 building inspection fails

The costs involved with buying a home can sometimes be overwhelming. Legal bills, mortgage establishment fees and hefty stamp duty can quickly add up. So it might seem tempting to forgo the recommended pre-purchase building and pest inspection reports to save yourself a few hundred dollars, right?

Wrong. Pre-purchase reports are essential, not only to make sure you’re making a sound investment, but also so you can use the information to negotiate a lower price for your property if you have to carry out any repairs. You also need an expert eye to see through any cosmetic improvements that might be concealing some serious structural issues.

Here at HomeHub, we spoke to a number of builders to bring you the top five building inspection issues they come across.

 

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Drainage is reported to be the number one building issue found in pre-property inspection reports.

 

Drainage

With the huge volumes of rainfall we’re currently experiencing across Australia, it’s no surprise that drainage is the number one building issue found in pre-property inspection reports.

Drainage deficiencies such as blocked or broken gutters, missing downpipes and issues with stormwater run-off can cause costly and often unseen damage to the roof, footings and foundations. Ineffective gutters can also cause rainwater to back flow in the eaves or between the gutter and fascia, which can cause mould and timber rot. And the wetting and drying of soil around footings causes movement that can lead to structural cracks.

If you can smell damp downstairs and the house is built into a hill, you may also have bad drainage behind the subfloor walls due to inadequate waterproofing, which can be a serious issue.

 

silver-shower-head-flying-running-water-drops

Old and deteriorating pipes, waste line issues and faulty fixtures can all cause water damage.

 

Plumbing

Plumbing issues are also very common, particularly with older houses and apartments. Old and deteriorating pipes, waste line issues and faulty fixtures can all cause water damage and are often not immediately obvious.

Leaking showers caused by old fibreglass waterproofing methods can also allow moisture to collect behind tiles and the bathroom walls. Look out for bubbling or peeling paintwork in the bathroom or a recent paint job that might hide this type of damage.

 

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A good building inspector will assess the integrity of your roof both inside and outside.

 

Roof damage

Although most roofs are well-built and hard-wearing, roof damage such as cracked tiles and decayed sarking often goes undetected until it’s too late and leaks start to occur. A good building inspector will assess the integrity of your roof both inside and outside, identify any cracked tiles or tiles that have already been sealed and repaired, advise on sealant maintenance and check the general condition of the gutters.

 

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Bad ventilation in the roof can cause dampness, mould growth, water damage and rot.

 

Ventilation

Bad ventilation in a home, particularly in the roof, can cause a range of issues from damp, mould growth, water damage and rot. When selling a home, many homeowners will give the interior a fresh coat of paint, hiding telltale mould and damp areas. A thorough building inspection will highlight any areas of concern.

 

asbestos-siding-falling-apart-exposed-wood-felt-underneath-old

Houses built before 1990 are likely to contain asbestos in areas such as cladding, fibro sheets, roofing, guttering and fencing.

 

Asbestos

Finally, a building inspector will also identify any asbestos in your home. As a general rule, if your house was built before 1990, it’s likely to contain asbestos in areas such as cladding, fibro sheets, roofing, guttering and fencing.

The good news is, undisturbed asbestos presents very little risk to human health. But if you’re considering any structural renovations after your purchase, you would be wise to know what you’re dealing with.

 

For more information on what should be included in a pre-property inspection report, contact your local department of commerce or fair trading.

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Hedgie Gundry

Hedgie Gundry is an experienced copywriter, communications consultant and content creator. For almost two decades, she’s helped big brands and small businesses communicate clearly with the wider world. When she’s not working her wordsmith magic, Hedgie helps run a small building company and is a keen renovator. She therefore has a special interest writing about all things property.

The opinions expressed in this article are the opinions of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Homeloans Ltd.