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Do you know your Aussie slang? [Infographic]

Understanding accents is one of the exciting challenges travellers face when visiting countries, and Australia is no different. We might speak Australian English but our unique slang terms, expressions and idiosyncracies can leave people perplexed – even to fellow Aussies!

 

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Infographic via Mark McCrindle

 

Australia is a big country and each city, region and even schools have their own slang terms which mystify people even from neighbouring areas.

“To illustrate, the afternoon in the east coast (Victoria, New South Wales, and Queensland) is ‘arvo’ whereas in South Australia it is ‘aftie’. The kid’s chasing game – i.e. being ‘safe’ – is ‘bar’ in New South Wales, whereas it is ‘barleys’ in Western Australia, South Australia, and Victoria,” explains author and social researcher, Mark McCrindle.

“Similarly, an unsophisticated person in the outer suburbs of Sydney and Melbourne is a ‘westie’, whereas in the more affluent areas of Brisbane’s western suburbs this person is called a ‘bogan’ or ‘bevan’, and in places where the western suburbs are coastal (i.e. Perth and Adelaide) such a person is called a ‘boonie’.”

 

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Infographic via Mark McCrindle

 

Word Up

For more than a decade, Mark has been researching the emerging generations and the language they use, which he says not only creates but also defines their sub-cultures.

“Drawing on surveys, focus groups, studies, statistics and online research, Word Up is an analysis of our ever-changing language and patterns of communication,” he says. “For educators, employers, leaders and parents who rely on technology and spoken and written communications to influence and engage across the generations, this is an invaluable guide.”

Learn more about the book here.

The official term for Aussie slang and pronunciation is ‘strine’ and it is often defined by making words – almost any in the dictionary – as short as possible. Don’t believe me? Then check this out!

 

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Veda Dante

Veda Dante is an accomplished journalist, consultant and content creator who has nearly 30 years’ experience writing about everything from tourism, hospitality and health to architecture, pools and luxury goods. When she’s not producing copy for clients, this self-confessed word nerd is usually writing and photographing the Byron Bay region for her blog www.livebyron.com.au

The opinions expressed in this article are the opinions of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Homeloans Ltd.