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Nutrition, hormones, stress and lifestyle habits can affect the health of our hair.
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How to get healthy summer hair

Hair loss affects over two million Australian women each year thanks to everything from stress to diet and hormone fluctuations. However, for many of us, it’s usually temporary. If you have been brushing your hair and noticing you’re losing a few more strands than usual, or it has lost its usual shine and bounce, it’s time to look at the underlying cause.

 

1.  Young women experience hair loss too

The concept of balding or thinning hair is usually associated with age, but young women struggle with hair loss conditions too. Think of your hair as an indicator of your inner health. When your organs or hormones are struggling with poor nutrition or regulation, your hair looks lifeless and dull. When your body is really struggling though, your hair starts to fall out leading to hair loss. Women of all ages struggle with stress, hormone imbalances and poor nutrition, so plenty of younger women and even teenagers experience hair loss.

2.  Your diet has a lot to do with it

“You are what you eat” may sound like some old wives’ tale, but it still holds true, particularly when it comes to female hair loss. The only living parts of your hair strand are the root and follicle, and they receive their nutrition from the blood flow in your scalp. Like any part of your body though, if the blood getting to the area is devoid of nutrients, the follicle won’t thrive. Anyone on a crash diet will notice how dry their skin feels when they’re limiting nutrients, and your hair will feel it too.

A diet low in protein is often to blame for female hair loss. Keratin is your hair’s natural in-built protein, but sometimes it needs a boost. By ingesting other proteins, you help boost the strength and integrity of your hair at the follicle. If you’re vegetarian, don’t worry! There are plenty of protein rich plant-based foods including everything from legumes to super grains like quinoa and amaranth.

You’ve probably heard omega-3 fatty acids are all the rage for glowing skin, but they help your hair growth too. Omega-3 plus proteins, vitamin B-12 and iron from fish sources are the perfect ways to prevent a dry scalp and boost the health of your hair. Dark leafy veggies high in vitamins also help with your hair’s natural oil production which is like your body’s own built-in conditioner.

Your hair reflects your diet, so use the handy tips above to nourish your body, and at the same time, nourish your hair to prevent hair loss.

 

3.  You eat well, but you’ve just gone through a huge life-changing event

Stressful events like divorce, losing a loved one or trauma can cause significant hair loss due to the hormonal change crisis creates. A hugely stressful event can alter your regular hormonal balance, yielding a higher level of testosterone which can trigger hair loss. The best news is, it’s not permanent.

By slowly working with a mental health professional and adding mindfulness practices to your day, you can slowly work to change your body’s level of adrenaline, and your hormonal balance will shift. After a traumatic event, hair loss can take a number of months to recover from, but it will repair and restore in time.

4.  Something’s just not right – it might be your hormones

Hormonal fluctuations are normal throughout a woman’s life, especially throughout pregnancy and menopause, and when changing your contraceptive pill. During these changes, your body’s internal balance shifts, and these shifts in progesterone can lead to hair loss.

If you’ve noticed you’re losing more hair than normal in your brush every day, chat to your doctor, as you may need to swap your contraceptive pill. If you’re pregnant or going through menopause, you may need to see a Trichologist to understand how your hair is coping with your new hormonal balance.

Female hair loss is often your body’s way of telling you something is off balance, and it’s a great chance to look at your habits and see what you can do to change. Luckily, it’s not permanent, but the changes start with you.

 

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Veda Dante

Veda Dante is an accomplished journalist, consultant and content creator who has nearly 30 years’ experience writing about everything from tourism, hospitality and health to architecture, pools and luxury goods. When she’s not producing copy for clients, this self-confessed word nerd is usually writing and photographing the Byron Bay region for her blog www.livebyron.com.au

The opinions expressed in this article are the opinions of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Homeloans Ltd.